{{ currentBoardShortName }}
  • Markets
  • Indices
  • FX
  • Energy
  • Metals
  • Live
Markets
As of: {{timeStamp.date}}
{{timeStamp.time}}

Markets

{{ currentBoardShortName }}
  • Markets
  • Indices
  • FX
  • Energy
  • Metals
  • Live
{{data.symbol | reutersRICLabelFormat:group.RICS}}
 
{{data.netChng | number: 4 }}
{{data.netChng | number: 2 }}
{{data | displayCurrencySymbol}} {{data.price | number: 4 }}
{{data.price | number: 2 }}
{{data.symbol | reutersRICLabelFormat:group.RICS}}
 
{{data.netChng | number: 4 }}
{{data.netChng | number: 2 }}
{{data | displayCurrencySymbol}} {{data.price | number: 4 }}
{{data.price | number: 2 }}

Latest Videos

{{ currentStream.Name }}

Related Video

Continuous Play:
ON OFF

The information you requested is not available at this time, please check back again soon.

More Video

Oct 29, 2018

SNC-Lavalin preliminary inquiry begins in Libyan fraud and corruption case

SNC-Lavalin seeks public support in bribery allegations case

VIDEO SIGN OUT

Security Not Found

The stock symbol {{StockChart.Ric}} does not exist

See Full Stock Page ?

MONTREAL - A month-long preliminary inquiry into SNC-Lavalin Group Inc. kicked off Monday, more than three-and-a-half years after federal authorities slapped the construction and engineering giant with fraud and corruption charges.

Prosecutors began to present their case to a Court of Quebec judge, who will decide whether the evidence merits moving forward with a criminal trial.

In February 2015, the RCMP charged SNC and two subsidiaries with paying nearly $48 million to public officials in Libya between 2001 and 2011 to influence government decisions under the Moammar Gadhafi regime. The RCMP also hit the Montreal-based company, its construction division and a subsidiary with one charge each of fraud and corruption for allegedly defrauding various Libyan organizations of about $130 million.

A conviction could bar SNC from working for the federal government for up to 10 years.

An RCMP officer gave evidence before Judge Claude Leblond, who placed a publication ban on all evidence presented at the hearing.

The preliminary inquiry went ahead after federal prosecutors declined to offer to negotiate a remediation agreement under a new provision of the Criminal Code. The hearing is slated to continue through to Nov. 30, with a one week break in mid-November.